Authorship & Collaboration: A Response to The Nation’s Ode to the Coast | Positions & Practice

Exploring authorship and collaboration opens a whole can of worms in many respects but has also broadened my understanding of collaboration.

While I find it troublesome that works involving ‘found’ photos such as that of Schmid seem to sidestep questions of consent – both of the original photographer but also the subject – context does also play a part. Pieces made for the art gallery naturally have a more limited audience than those, for example, appropriated, amended, edited, re-purposed or simply recirculated without consent – but does that actually change the moral principle at stake?

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Reading Photographs | Positions & Practice

“Every time we look at a photograph, we are aware, however slightly, of the photographer selecting that sight from an infinity of other possible sights. This is true even in the most casual family snapshot. The Photographer’s way of seeing is reflected in his choice of subject …

“…although every image embodies a way of seeing, our perception or appreciation of the image depends also upon our way of seeing…

” …when an image is presented as a work of art, the way people look at it is affected by a whole series of learnt assumptions about art.” (BERGER, 1972: 10-11).

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Identity and transitions: methods and meanings | Positions & Practice

I’ve been reflecting on the themes, methods and methodologies that run through my non-client work of late. Much of my work has focused on identities and I realise transitions.

My Motherhood and Identity: Tattooed Mamas Breaking the Taboos was very clearly aligned with these themes exploring the transition from an individual identity to one as a ‘mother’ and how this skewed the way society perceived individuals in ways that were unexpected to new mothers.

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On windows and mirrors: Photography – a window on the world or a reflection of the soul? | Positions & Practice

The mirror/window analogy in photography is an interesting perspective – are we documenting the world around us and providing the viewer with a window on that world, much like the popular early stereographs of geographic landmarks, depicting aspects of the world the viewer doesn’t have immediate direct access to, or providing an insight into our inner world, projecting our own subjective interpretation or attempting to reveal our inner world to an outside audience? Is our audience ‘out there’ or ourselves.

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